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Mental Health Facts and Statistics

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Our mental health is so often overlooked merely because it’s a constant facet we must always be aware of 24/7/365. After all, our minds constantly process information, develop new thoughts, and evolve based on chemical makeup and our surroundings. For this reason, having an awareness of various mental health facts, figures, and statistics can help us maintain our mental health. We’ve compiled a variety of facts to help bring awareness and understanding to different health conditions. This article breaks these pieces of information down into generalized facts and figures, seasonal affective disorder, anxiety, physical pain (its impact on mental health), and aging.

Mental Health Facts and Statistics

General Mental Health Statistics

Our mental health is so often overlooked merely because it’s a constant facet we must always be aware of 24/7/365. After all, our minds constantly process information, develop new thoughts, and evolve based on chemical makeup and our surroundings. For this reason, having an awareness of various mental health facts, figures, and statistics can help us maintain our mental health. We’ve compiled a variety of facts to help bring awareness and understanding to different health conditions. This article breaks these pieces of information down into generalized facts and figures, seasonal affective disorder, anxiety, physical pain (its impact on mental health), and aging.
Many types of mental illness vary in severity. The two broad categories used to define conditions include: Any Mental Illness (AMI): Encompasses all known mental illnesses and varies in impact and level of impairment (mild to severe) Severe Mental Illness (SMI): A smaller and more severe subcategory of AMI. These mental illnesses cause severe functional impairment and interfere with or limit one or more major life activities.
20.6% of all U.S. adults (51.6 million) were estimated to have AMI in 2019
AMI was more prevalent in females (24.5%) than males (16.3%) in 2019
AMI was more prevalent in young adults aged 18-25 at 29.4%. In adults aged 29-49, it was 25%, and for those aged 50+, it was 14.1%.
AMI was more prevalent among adults who reported two or more races (31.7%), with white adults trailing at 22.2%. It was lowest amongst Asian adults at 14.4%.
In 2019, an estimated 13.1 million U.S. adults reported having SMI, making up 5.2% of the entire U.S. adult population.
SMI prevalence was higher in females (6.5%) than males (3.9%).

Seasonal Affective Disorder Facts

January and February are the months people with SAD struggle the most.
The further you go north in the U.S., the more common SAD is. For example, SAD is seven times more common in Washington State compared to Florida
Roughly 5% of U.S. adults experience SAD and say it lasts 40% of the year.
SAD can begin at any age but typically starts with those between 18 and 30 your chances of SAD go down as you age.
More than half a million people in the U.S. suffer from SAD. 10-20% may suffer from a mild form of winter blues
¾ of those suffering from SAD are women
Many people with SAD report having a close relative with a mental disorder such as severe depressive disorder (55 percent) or alcohol abuse (34 percent).
Five of the ten states with the most depressing winters are located downwind from one of the great lakes. This causes sunlight to be a rarity in the winter
Arizona, Florida, and Hawaii have been found to have the sunniest winters, making them easier for those with SAD .

Seasonal Affective disorder Resources

Anxiety Facts

Anxiety disorders affect 18.1% of the U.S. adult population (40 million adults), making them the most common form of mental illness.
Anxiety disorders affect 18.1% of the U.S. adult population (40 million adults), making them the most common form of mental illness.
Those suffering from anxiety disorders are 3-5 times more likely to see a doctor. They are six times more likely to be hospitalized for their illness than those without.
Risk factors for anxiety disorders include genetics, brain chemistry, personality, and life events.
Women are twice as likely to develop an anxiety disorder compared to men.
Risk factors for anxiety disorders include genetics, brain chemistry, personality, and life events.
Common types of anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and autism.

Physical Pain and Mental Health

Those with chronic pain are four times more likely to have depression and anxiety compared to those who are pain-free.
Mood and anxiety disorders occur at higher rates amongst those with arthritis. Feelings of frustration may transpose into depression because of an inability to be social and perform daily activities.
It’s been found that females with fibromyalgia are five times higher at risk of developing anxiety disorders.
Those with multiple sclerosis are two times more likely to develop major depressive disorder than those without.
One study found those with a chronic pain condition experienced depressive symptoms for more extended periods.
Studies found 10% to 87% of those with chronic pain showed symptoms of depression.
The average suicide rate jumps from 12.6 per 100,000 to 45-81 per person-years 100,000 per person-years when filtering those with chronic pain
Studies have found that depression can make feelings of pain more noticeable and unpleasant.

Aging and Mental Health

An estimated 20% of those 55 years or older experience some mental health concern.
Depression is the most common type of mental health condition amongst older adults.
Depression is not a normal part of growing older and is treatable 80% of the time.
12.2% of those 65 years or older reported they “never” or “rarely” received the emotional and social support they needed compared to 8.1% of those 50-64 years old.
Almost 95% of adults 50 or older reported being “satisfied” or “very satisfied with their lives with around 5% being “dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied” with their lives.
Frequent mental distress (FMD), defined as having 14+ days of poor mental health, is uncommon amongst older adults. Just 9.2% of those 50 or older experience FMD, with those numbers dropping to 6.5% amongst those 65+.
Risk factors for developing late-onset depression include widowhood, physical illness, low educational levels (below high school), impaired functional status, and heavy alcohol consumption.
Anxiety is not common amongst older adults. Over 90% of adults over 50 didn’t report a lifetime diagnosis of anxiety.

Aging in Place Resources

About the Author

Brandon Landgraf is the Digital Marketing Manager for Carex Health Brands. He finds passion and fulfillment in creating content that enhances, improves, and enlivens others' quality of life. All of his written work is formulated to not only offer essential advice and tips but back it with proven studies and experts. His mission is to connect with readers and provide steps to make their lives better.

You can connect with him on LinkedIn here.

About Carex Health Brands

Carex is your one-stop shop for home medical equipment and for products that assist caregivers with providing the best possible support and care for their loved ones. Carex Health Brands has been the branded leader in in-home, self-care medical products for over 35 years. Our goal is to improve the lives of our customers by bring them quality products that bring dignity back to their lives. With our three nationally distributed brands, Carex Health Brands serves national, regional and independent food, drug and mass retailers along with wholesalers, distributors and medical dealers.

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